Did you know? Five facts about smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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圖片來自Flickr用戶incurable_hippie。

For many of the 12 million Americans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness, coughing and mucus production may not be symptoms of a nagging cold, but serious, daily effects of a progressive, irreversible lung disease that includes the respiratory illnesses chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Continue reading

Smoking threatens children’s health

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Smoking kills, even if you don’t smoke. As a result of widespread tobacco use, approximately 443,000 Americans die each year from tobacco-related illnesses, such as cancer and heart disease, according to a 2008 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 11 percent of these deaths resulted from secondhand smoke exposure.

“[Secondhand smoking] is a very serious problem,” said Geri Healey-Dame, System Director of Respiratory Care for Hallmark Health System. “I believe it’s pretty significant. We see a lot of patients with lung disease. They can be people who have never smoked, but work in a smoking environment, like waitresses and bartenders.” Continue reading

Smoking linked to hearing loss, Alzheimer’s

Smoking not only kills, but deafens people and robs them of their memory as well. It causes more than 440,000 deaths each year, or nearly one in five deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

Lung cancer was most deadly cancer for Boston’s Asians from 2006 to 2008, ahead of liver and colorectal cancers, according to the Boston Public Health Commission. The lethal consequences of smoking are a clear reason to quit. Continue reading

One smoker increases health risk to nonsmokers

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Many factors cause cancer. From manmade chemicals to environmental exposure, secondhand smoke contributes to health problems that affect the respiratory system, cardiac function and cancers.

Secondhand smoke is the most common cause of tobacco intake. While there are devices that can test for indoor chemicals and smoke, there are nearly no safety measures when encountering smoke outdoors. Because smoke can be anywhere at any time, even breathing in a little bit can be harmful. Continue reading