Chinatown meeting roundup: TCC, CNC

By Ling-Mei Wong

 

The Chinatown Coalition (TCC) met on May 14 at the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center.

The Chinatown Coalition met on May 14 at the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) 華埠社區聯盟於5月14日在波士頓華埠社區中心舉行會議。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

The Chinatown Coalition met on May 14 at the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

A presentation on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was given by Centers for Disease control senior study manager Nora Martinello. The voluntary survey collects health information, with the CDC looking for interpreters in Suffolk County. For more information on interpreting jobs, visit www.westat.com/careers/field-data-collection-positions and reference NHANES.

Chinatown Land Trust (CLT) board member Suzanne Lee discussed the land trust’s goals and current status. Its four goals are:

1) Preserve subsidized housing, as some locations are not permanent and will become market-rate properties after a certain amount of time,

2) Create 1,000 new or newly preserved affordable units over the next 10 years,

3) Work with Boston to encourage lower-priced market and mixed-income housing,

4) Work with universities to provide more dorm housing for students, as taking up space for families.

The CLT is working to pool land for the land trust; the buildings on the land trust belong to the homeowners, Lee said. As the land trust is a nonprofit, property taxes for homeowners are assessed at a lower rate.

“When I first heard about this, I thought, ‘Who the heck wants to give their house away?’“ Lee said. “You still sell the house, but you sell it to the community rather than a developer.”

CLT made an offer for rowhouses at 101 and 103 Hudson Street, but the owner accepted a lower offer from a developer. The developer recently applied for demolition permits instead of repairing the houses, Lee said.

 

CNC

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Council (CNC) met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on May 18.

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Council met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on May 18. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) 華埠南灣社區議會於5月18日在中華公所舉行了會議。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Council met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on May 18. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

The council heard a presentation from the Boston Redevelopment Authority’s senior urban designer and architect Corey Zehnegebot. The Urban Renewal Act is due to be renewed from 1975, as Boston has changed since then. More information is online at http://maps.bostonredevelopmentauthority.org/UrbanRenewal/, with a Chinatown community meeting planned for June 9 or 10 at the China Trade Center.

The CNC heard two proposals for advertising space along Kneeland Street. It will write a support letter for G Brand, which proposed an ad wrapper at 30 Kneeland Street. While the building owner has agreed to the proposed ad space, G Brand has not yet applied for the relevant permits.

Pine Street Inn’s billboard is managed by G Brand, said Greg John, G Brand president.

G Brand's billboard on the Pine Street Inn. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) G Brand負責Pine Street Inn樓上的廣告版圍。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

G Brand’s billboard on the Pine Street Inn. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

 

As the owner of Kane’s Donuts, John uses his advertising company G Brand to give back to the community. The majority of ad income from the Pine Street Inn billboard goes to the shelter, with John proposing a similar arrangement for the community at 30 Kneeland Street.

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About Ling-Mei Wong 黃靈美

Editor of the Sampan, the only bilingual Chinese-English newspaper in New England 舢舨報紙總編輯。舢舨是全紐英倫唯一的中英雙語雙週報。
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