Boston mayor releases plan for 53,000 housing units by 2030

Mayor Marty Walsh announced plans to add 53,000 housing units in Boston by 2030 on Oct. 9 at the One Greenway construction site in Chinatown. (Image courtesy of Vekonda Luangaphay.)

Mayor Marty Walsh announced plans to add 53,000 housing units in Boston by 2030 on Oct. 9 at the One Greenway construction site in Chinatown. (Image courtesy of Vekonda Luangaphay.)

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh released “Housing a Changing City: Boston 2030,” a plan for housing that calls for 53,000 new units by 2030 on Oct. 9 at the One Greenway construction site.

The plan focuses on four demographic groups: Seniors, low-income households, the middle class and students. A total of 5,000 new units will be for seniors, 44,000 new units for the workforce and 4,000 new units for vacancies to stabilize the market.

“(Seniors) must be able to age in their homes. They have earned that right and we need them as neighbors,” Walsh said. “We need to support services and help them with financial assistance.”

The city will dedicate 6,5000 of the affordable housing units for low-income and non-elderly households, in which the city’s goal is to ensure that 1,700 of the units are accessible to extremely low-income individuals earning less than $25,000 a year. Of the new units, 20,000 will be for middle-class workforce.

“We have to make sure our workforce can afford to live and stay in the city and to stay in our growth and support our civic life, to achieve this pace we have,” Walsh said.

The plan also calls for universities to produce more dormitories, freeing up 5,000 units — currently occupied by students — to be available for working professionals. The city plans to add 16,000 undergraduate dorm beds to reduce off-campus living in Boston by 50 percent by partnering with colleges and universities, as one of the action plans.

Janelle Chan, executive director at the Asian Community Development Corporation, provided updates on the One Greenway project, which will comprises 363 new housing units slated for completion in 2015. Of the homes, 40 percent will be affordable to families with extremely low incomes, low incomes and middle incomes. “I look forward to cutting that ribbon with you all next year,” she said.

With a growing city and a forecast of reaching more than 700,000 Boston residents by 2030 — a figure the city had not seen since the 1950s — the project is expected to bring in $21 billion in new development, creating 51,000 jobs.

“Prosperity must reach every neighborhood. Anyone who wants to contribute to our city should be able to find a home no matter their income their age, their race or their abilities,” Walsh said.

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