Governor candidates Berwick, Coakley and Falchuk visit Chinatown

By Candice Chen and Kenny Sui-Fung Yim

 

Don Berwick

On March 27, gubernatorial candidate Don Berwick came to Chinatown to attend the “Corner Office” forums sponsored by Gov. Patrick’s Asian American Commission and 24 community organizations.

 

Berwick is a Democrat. After graduating from Harvard University, Berwick devoted his work to medicine and health care. He is also a former administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

As a gubernatorial candidate, Berwick’s focus is health care and poverty. Berwick said in Massachusetts, 15 percent of the population is below the poverty line and it is his duty to help them get what they deserve.

“As a doctor, what I would do first is not to talk, but to let others talk,” said Berwick.

 

Martha Coakley

Current Attorney General, and governor aspirant of Massachusetts, Martha Coakley, visited Tantric Bistro in Chinatown on March 31.

Coakley’s achievements include being a national leader during the recent recession, holding banks accountable for foreclosures, and keeping 400 million people in their homes. She supported the Defense of Marriage Act, worked to protect children online who were affected by bullying, increased women’s access to reproductive services, and improved mental health services.

Coakley said that the future is critical, and she would ensure “everyone has the opportunity to get on the economic ladder.”

As for potentially becoming the highest executive figure in the state, and the first female to hold the position, she said, “After graduating from high school, my father gave me a plague that said, ‘Sometimes the best man for the job is a woman.”

 

Evan Falchuk spoke on April 8 at the Metropolitan with Leverett Wing (left). Falchuk is running for Mass. governor. (Image courtesy of Kenny Sui-Fung Yim.)

Evan Falchuk spoke on April 8 at the Metropolitan with Leverett Wing (left). Falchuk is running for Mass. governor. (Image courtesy of Kenny Sui-Fung Yim.)

Evan Falchuk

Evan Falchuk said he was tired of hearing the “lesser of two evils.” He took his independent message into new territory with his the United Independent Party. And Falchuk doesn’t think he’s alone — he wants to mobilize 53 percent of Mass. residents who are not identified with either the Republican or Democratic parties to join him with what he calls “bold, innovative, new ideas”. He spoke on his vision on April 8 at the Metropolitan. Currently, he is an executive at Global Health.

Falchuk said, “When only a tiny percentage of people vote, your issues may not be addressed.”

He said Asian American voters are remarkably well organized, echoing sentiments that audience members could appreciate such as “civil rights need to be protected and money spent more wisely.”

This post is also available in: Chinese

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