Forbes House Museum announces topics for the 2014 Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest

The Forbes House Museum Lincoln Committee is happy to announce the topics for the 2014 Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest, an annual tradition begun by Mary Bowditch Forbes in 1924.

This year, essays will be accepted from students in grades 5-8 and drawings will be accepted from students in grades K-4.

Submissions of essays and drawings are due by Friday, 28 February 2014 at 5pm. An awards ceremony will take place on Sunday, 6 April 2014 at 2pm at St. Agatha School, Milton, where prizes and complimentary museum memberships will be given to the winners in each grade level.

The essay and drawing topics are as follows:

2014 Lincoln Essay Contest Question for Grades 5-8:

One hundred and fifty years ago, on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous Gettysburg Address, where he said:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task
remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

In the Address, two of the most notable quotes are:
“… all men are created equal.”
“…government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
What do these principles mean to us as Americans?

2014 Lincoln Drawing Contest Topic for Grades K-4:
Draw President Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address.

How to Submit an Essay or Drawing:
The guidelines for submission of essays and drawings have been updated and can be obtained by visiting the Museum’s website at http://www.forbeshousemuseum.org/educational.html. Additionally, a PDF brochure of the guidelines is also available at the bottom of the Educational webpage; it can be downloaded and printed for easy access.

What is the Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest?The Forbes House Museum Lincoln Committee is happy to announce the topics for the 2014 Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest, an annual tradition begun by Mary Bowditch Forbes in 1924.

This year, essays will be accepted from students in grades 5-8 and drawings will be accepted from students in grades K-4.

Submissions of essays and drawings are due by Friday, 28 February 2014 at 5pm. An awards ceremony will take place on Sunday, 6 April 2014 at 2pm at St. Agatha School, Milton, where prizes and complimentary museum memberships will be given to the winners in each grade level.

 

The essay and drawing topics are as follows:

 

2014 Lincoln Essay Contest Question for Grades 5-8:

One hundred and fifty years ago, on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous Gettysburg Address, where he said:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task

remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

 

In the Address, two of the most notable quotes are:

“… all men are created equal.”

“…government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

What do these principles mean to us as Americans?

 

2014 Lincoln Drawing Contest Topic for Grades K-4:

Draw President Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address.

 

How to Submit an Essay or Drawing:

The guidelines for submission of essays and drawings have been updated and can be obtained by visiting the Museum’s website at http://www.forbeshousemuseum.org/educational.html. Additionally, a PDF brochure of the guidelines is also available at the bottom of the Educational webpage; it can be downloaded and printed for easy access.

 

What is the Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest?

The Lincoln Essay and Drawing Contest was established in 1924 by Mary Bowditch Forbes (1878- 1962), granddaughter of Captain Robert Bennet Forbes. Ms. Forbes greatly admired President Abraham Lincoln, and in 1909 began collecting Lincoln and Civil War artworks and memorabilia, which are now part of the Museum’s permanent collection. To promote appreciation for our 16th president, Ms. Forbes requested original essays and drawings from students each year, inspired by the life and work of Abraham Lincoln.

Today, the Museum continues the tradition, and sends an annual request for essays and drawings from students throughout Milton and Greater Boston. Each fall, the FHM Lincoln Committee, comprised of Museum Trustees, K-12 educators, Lincoln historians and Civil War enthusiasts, meets to debate and select a question and topic. The question and topic are then released to the public, and students must use the question or topic as the subject for their essay or drawing.

Individual student submissions are encouraged. The FHM Lincoln Essay and Drawing Contest was established as a civic exercise, challenging students to excellence outside the scope of their regular school work.

K-12 educators are also welcome to introduce the essay and drawing question or topic to their students as part of a classroom lesson or unit of instruction. A submission of individual essays and drawings, gathered into one package by an educator, is accepted and encouraged.

First, second and third place winners are chosen among the entries for each grade level.

For more information about the Museum’s group tours, special events and programs, including the Lincoln Essay & Drawing Contest, call the office at 617.696.1815, or visit our website at www.forbeshousemuseum.org.

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